Friday, July 13, 2012

Fur 'n Feathers, at the farm... The fluff episode.

We have pictures of the chicks, FINALLY.  They are getting big enough that they don't necessarily want to stay under Mom all the time, so I managed to snap a pic or two when they went "exploring".

I think they are all three girls this round...  At least I hope so.  I need a few new egg layers.  Let's just say I am becoming the local geriatric ward for poultry.  (sigh)

These are two different llamas, but this is a before and after picture, as today was shearing day.

Fuzzy...


And,of course, de-fuzzed.  Dolly, the brown one, was a butt.  We suspect that it might have been her first shearing.  She stomped, she kicked, spat, was just ridiculous. (While llamas have a bad reputation, the spitting part is usually about the most obnoxious, kicking and such is unusual.)  The shearer was on his toes, though, and so was I.  She kicked so hard she knocked a pipe off the chute, I missed getting a klonk to the head!    


But after some re-tying, and creative support, read: I had her in a head lock, while the shearer tied her front feet so she couldn't go far, we got her toenails clipped, too.   What a change from the night before, when I fed Lorenzo, and Husband picked up each foot and clipped.  No ropes, no halter, just food.  


We found that Toni, and Annie were much better.  Toni, however, managed to slip her halter, I usually unbuckle them, and they walk right into the pasture.  Weeeellll, she thought the grass by the road looked more tasty, I guess.  With a little llama round up, we had her back in about a minute, but that was... Um. Interesting.  


Annie is showing her age a bit, sharp, sharp hips.  I was worried that I hadn't fed her enough, until the sheared commented that her ribs weren't showing, and she was clear eyed.  So I felt a bit better.  


No babies tho.  (sigh, again.)  Not ONE of the girls came up preggers, and boy, it wasn't because Lorenzo wasn't trying.  A lot.  Continually...  


Ahem.  


But, that is the way it goes sometimes.  I still have a great group of llamas, and I now have even more fiber to get something done with, so I have decided to try doing cleaning and such with a small batch, and see how it comes out, then decide if it is worth taking to a fiber mill, or just doing it myself.  


Oh, and I was spreading wood chips in the chicken yard, and sat down.  I thought that this lead to a very nice picture of Rudee, who decided he needed to sit, too...  He is keeping an eye out for Lorenzo, as they, uh, don't get along very well.  When the llamas first arrived, Rudee decided Lorenzo was fun to chase and annoy, and Lorenzo decided Rudee was an obnoxious ass.  And responded by spraying him green.  I allowed this, so Rudee would learn his lesson.  As you can see, it took.  Lorenzo does NOT get chased, and Rudee is much better behaved.  


Win win, in my book.  



16 comments:

  1. Although it's hard work, it must be nice living with the animals.

    Dolly's reaction is the reason animals that are meant to be sheared should be handled, frequently and gently, and gotten used to clippers and such things, from a very early age.

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    1. Yes, I get 'rescues', and we never know quite what to expect. I will work with her more, and see if we can convince her the world isn't going to end if she gets her toenails clipped...

      Cat

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  2. So you CAN teacher an old dog new tricks. At least llamas can.

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    1. At least it took!

      Cat

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  3. The chicks are adorable, so cute. The after shot of the llama - she looks so forlorn. Does it take long to grow back? I'm not sure I would behave myself if I was going to look like that! LOL

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    1. They start to have "normal" looking hair in about 3 or so months, they still are short haired, but it doesn't look so buzz cut. I think they actually like having the hair off this time of year, they can get at all the itchy spots!

      Cat

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  4. LOL! Poor Rudee. Our dog would not have minded the spraying he just loves to get stinky. However, he does stay clear of our sheep; they have butted him a few times now but it finally took.

    Beauitful blog!

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    1. Yes, I am surprised that he didn't have a 'oh, it's bad smelling' love affair with it, but maybe it was too stinky even for him? Who knows...


      Cat

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  5. Wow, shearing llama's is dangerous! New chicks are exciting, unfortunately one of ours "crowed" today for the first time - no eggs forthcoming!

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    1. Shearing any animal can be dangerous, but it was more in the order of avoiding falling objects, not so much the danger of being kicked... If you pay attention, they don't (generally)
      try and kick at you, but try to make you move away, so they can run. Llamas are more oriented to getting out of a situation, than fighting. I have one of my hens that is crowing... Eep.

      Cat

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  6. You sure have a lot of llamas. I don't think I realized that before. The chicks are really cute and so is your now well behaved Rudee.

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    1. I had 5, but lost one this winter, I have 4 fuzzikins right now. And I agree... ;D

      Cat

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  7. I used to have a long-haired cat that I would shave every Spring, and she looked every bit as hilarious as your llamas! The peeps are adorable, here's to hoping they're girls.

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    1. Yep, we did that to one of our cats, and he wouldn't look at us for a month or two, until the hair started growing again, but the poor cat would get matts like crazy if we didn't...

      Cat.

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  8. Anonymous11:36 AM

    Oh, poor Rudee! That made me smile.Sometimes we have to learn our lessons that way though. :-)

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    1. Fortune would have it he hasn't had to learn the hard way too many times...

      Cat

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